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The History of Pandemics and Impact on Society – A Series

How have pandemics impacted our society? How do we understand pandemics and study them?

The emergence of COVID-19 brings the world to its latest historic moment at the hands of an invisible enemy. In this revealing series, Marquette faculty explore the intersection of humans and disease and how that dynamic has transformed the way people live, work and coexist. By examining historic pandemics and what has been learned over hundreds of years about the link between disease and the human experience, faculty throughout the series will offer new perspectives that prompt us all to reflect on the current circumstances – the 2020 pandemic that has fundamentally changed human existence throughout the world.

SESSION 4: RECORDED ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2020
Social and Political Consequences of Global Disease – What Could be the Long Term Effects of COVID-19?

Presented by Dr. Risa Brooks, Allis Chalmers Associate Professor of Political Science at Marquette University, an adjunct scholar at West Point’s Modern War Institute (2017-2020), and a non-resident senior associate in the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies

In the final webinar of the series, learn about the social and political consequences of disease and pandemics like the 1918 flu and HIV/AIDs in Sub Saharan Africa and some of the potential longer-term global effects of COVID-19.

Risa Brooks is Allis Chalmers Associate Professor of Political Science at Marquette University, an adjunct scholar at West Point’s Modern War Institute (2017-2020), and a non-resident senior associate in the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Professor Brooks is the author of Shaping Strategy: The Civil-Military Politics of Strategic Assessment (Princeton University Press, 2008). She is also coeditor (with Lionel Beehner and Daniel Maurer) of the forthcoming Reconsidering American Civil-Military Relations: Politics, Society and Modern War (Oxford University Press) and coeditor (with Elizabeth Stanley) of Creating Military Power: The Sources of Military Effectiveness (Stanford University Press, 2007). She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, and her professional experiences include positions as research associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and postdoctoral fellow at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). She has served as associate editor for the academic journals International Security and Security Studies. Her research interests include U.S. and global/comparative civil-military relations, political violence and militant organizations, and the Middle East and North Africa region.

DON'T MISS THE REST OF THE PANDEMICS SERIES

 

 

 

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